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Untitled

Figure in yellow fur-trimmed suit and muff in park-like setting (framed). "Gift to FIT library from the estate of Robert Knox August 1973. Temps Gris;" Color: watercolor; Signed lr, Verso: card Galerie Charpentier, Paris; Client Gazette du Bon Ton

Brissaud, Pierre, 1885-1964

Untitled

Elegant family at races with coach in background (framed). "Gift to FIT library from the estate of Robert Knox August 1973. Le Jour des Drags;" Color: watercolor; Signed lr, Verso: card Galerie Charpentier, Paris; Client Gazette du Bon Ton

Brissaud, Pierre, 1885-1964

May Connor papers, 1890-1915

  • US NNFIT SC.218
  • Collection
  • 1890-1915

Contains 61 fragile articles of correspondence from the 1890s, graduation announcement, poem-prayer book, pressed flowers, wedding invitations, 2 book marks, 2 spools of thread, 1 round silk or satin rigid ribbon, and photograph. Publications include E. Marcus Reynolds: Joy Taylor System; Teacher's College: The Domestic Art Review 1909; Boston Dress Cutting College, Directions for Harriet A Brown's Scientific Rules; Unity Union SS Library Catalogue of Books; National School Domestic Arts and Science brochure; Dormitory brochure; The Model House brochure.

Connor, May

Arnold Scaasi fashion sketches and swatches, 1966-1992

  • US NNFIT SC.297
  • Collection
  • 1966-1992

This collection cotains both original and photocopied sketches by Arnold Scassi ranging from 1966-1992. Each sketch is accompanied by a fabric swatch and is separated into 21 folders by the collection season ( i.e., Boutique Fall 92) Fabric content is often noted alongside an indication of its use. For example "Printed silk dress and jacket - dress has printed silk ruffle at neckline with white guipure lace edging. Jacket has matching ruffle cuffs." Included in some folders are pricelist, order forms and handwritten notes.

Scaasi, Arnold

Sally Victor photographs, Fall 1942

This folder contains black and white photographs depicting clothed women wearing Victor hats from 1942. Most photographs include typed descriptions attached and some have handwritten notes on the reverse side. Also, included are promotional materials.

Interior design elevations for retail spaces, 1980-1989

  • US NNFIT SC.221
  • Collection
  • 1980 - 1989

Seventeen pencil renderings of interior elevations for retail design on paper. Brands represented include Estée Lauder, Jordan Marsh, Bamberger's, and Liz Claiborne.

creator unknown

Barbara Bass interview, 1987 January 16

This interview covers broad subjects including women in the retail industry, family work balance, and the evolving role of the department store. The majority of the conversation concerns Bloomingdale's CEO at the time, Marvin S. Traub, with whom Barbara Bass worked closely. Bass talk about Traub's strong relationship with his wife, his high energy, his excellent listening skills, and his long-range style of thinking. Bass describes Traub as being pragmatic, and credits this as the reason why women and men are given equal opportunities in Bloomingdale's. Bass doesn't provide much information about her own job, only to describe her role as that of a "liason between the store line and the merchandising organizations." Though this was a time when there was speculation about the future downfall of department stores, Bass is positive in her statement that department stores will remain relavant as long as they continue to evolve with the customer. While Bass observes trends at this time to be less fast and severe than in the past, she does talk about Bloomingdale's as the birth place and death place of new trends. She then describes Bloomingdale's customer to be upscale, educated, "young-thinking", and traditionally dressed.

Bass, Barbara

Carles, 1941

This folder contains 2 fashion illustrations signed by Carles. The artist could possibly be Sara Johns who also went under the name Sara Carles Johns.

Harper's Bazaar

Hattie Carnegie sketches, 1940-1955

  • US NNFIT SC.242
  • Collection
  • 1940-1955

This collection is comprised of fashion sketches made for Hattie Carnegie, Inc. from 1940 - 1955. This collection contains millinery (hats) for which some designs can be attributed to Esther A. Kleeper in 1945. The remainder of the collection is ready-to-wear dresses and suits, along with evening wear, mostly ballgowns, that were adapted from French couturiers for the American woman. The sketches have been divided into millinery, ready-to-wear, and evening wear. Many of the sketches are not dated, but based upon a survey of the collection and dates of similar physical garments made by Hattie Carnegie, Inc. it is assumed that the sketches are from the aforementioned dates.

Carnegie, Hattie

Harper's Bazaar Fashion illustrations, 1940-1942

  • US NNFIT SC.369
  • Collection
  • 1940-1942

This collection contains fashion illustrations (mainly garments) executed for Harper's Bazaar between the years of 1940-1942 by Dagmar Freuchen-Gale, Sara Johns and Reynaldo Luza. On the back of the illustrations there are Harper's Bazaar issue numbers that the illustrations were published in.

Harper's Bazaar

Jeannette Jarnow interview, 1984 November 1

This interview is with Jeannette Jarnow, the first chairperson of the Buying and Merchandising Department at the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.). Jarnow describes her professional ascent at the department store, Abraham & Straus, up to 1944; when she took a brief break due to her first pregnancy. Jarnow describes the path that led her to seek out a teaching post at the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.). Instead of offering Jarnow a professorial post, Rosalind Snyder invited her to found the Buying and Merchandising Department in 1956. Jarnow describes the challenges of starting a department including the extent of publicity efforts for the department as well as for the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.) itself, still struggling to make its name known in the Industry. As there were little to no instructional materials available, Jarnow assembled several books such as, “The Mathematics of Retail Merchandising,” and “Inside the Fashion Business,” that would come to be used by other educational institutions as well as by professional training programs. Jarnow briefly theorizes why the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.) was not as impacted by student unrest in the 1960s before launching into a depiction of the industry seminars her department held as a service to the Industry. She continues on to discuss the evolution of merchandising with the rise of chain stores, and the ways in which the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.) stays on top of industry trends. Finally Jarnow lists a host of successful alumni such as Sidney Biddle Barrow, the “Mayflower Madam,” who became famous for founding the most expensive call-girl operation in New York City.

Oral History of FIT

This subseries is part of the first collection of oral history interviews conducted in the 1980s, mostly conducted by Mildred Finger, this series is comprised of interviews of people who were affiliated with the Fashion Institute of Technology.

Arsho Baghsarian shoe design collection, 1963-2008

  • US NNFIT SC.211
  • Collection
  • 1963-2008

Donated in March 2009, the Arsho Baghsarian shoe design collection comprises approximately 26 cubic feet (14 cubic feet for the sketches and 12 cubic feet for the sample shoes and embellishments). The collection contains 561 shoe prototypes (210 total pairs and 141 total single shoes), 9 original boxes, 4 accessories (2 pairs of Shin-Shams) and 4752 design sketches, some handbags but mostly shoes shown in profile. Many, especially during the later part of her career are sketch copies since the originals remain at the factory. The original sketches are done in pencil, ink and gouache and photocopied. Additionally, there are numerous fabric and leather swatches, samples of ornament and color charts, roughly 102 pattern pieces, 224 advertisements primarily from The New York Times and Footwear News, 47 photographs primarily from the Margaret Jerrold retrospective exhibition held at Lord and Taylor in 1982, assorted press clippings, and 43 spiral-bound shoe forecasts from the 1950’s and 1960’s from the Mademoiselle Shoe Company. This is undoubtedly an important collection due in part to Baghsarian’s artistry and sculptural sensibility. She was able to utilize and craft a wide variety of materials to produce throughout the world during a career that spanned more than forty years from 1963 through 2008. The range of materials makes the collection an important tool for conservation, while the collection of design sketches, actual shoe prototypes and marketing, sometimes in publications that have greatly transformed or no longer exist, gives students a sense of art marketing and fashion history.

Baghsarian, Arsho

Dean Marion Brandriss interview, 1984 December 19

This is an interview with Dean Marion Brandriss, who retired from the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.) in 1973. Brandriss explains her work as an English teacher and how she came to work at the City High School of Needle Trades where she met Mortimer Ritter. Brandriss explains how Ritter hand-picked his favorite instructors to help him build what would become the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.). She discusses touring high schools in the spring of 1944 to recruit students for the inaugural class, and offering incentives such as a weekly scholarship to all prospective students. Brandiss started at the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.) as the Director of Admissions, but elucidates the vast scope of work she and the small team were expected to take on. Brandriss describes the student body demographics, transitioning settings, and evolving admissions policies of the Institute as it continued to grow. Brandriss then explains how departments were added and goes into depth on the particular success of the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, N.Y.)?s Fashion Buying and Merchandising Department. Brandriss ends the interview with a recollection of Mortimer Ritter?s insistence on the Institute?s name, saying that he wanted it to resemble that of M.I.T. in sound and flavor.

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