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Frances Neady collection of original fashion illustrations, 1913-

  • US NNFIT SC.187
  • Collectie
  • 1913-

The Frances Neady collection of Original Fashion Illustrations was established in 1984 to honor its namesake, an inspirational teacher of fashion illustration. The collection encompasses over a century of fashion art. Its earliest example, a watercolor by Pierre Brissaud for Gazette du Bon Ton, is dated 1913; its most recent donation is by contemporary artist Ruben Toledo. Among other stars represented in the collection are Eric (Carl Erickson), René Bouché, Dorothy Hood, George Stavrinos, and Antonio (Lopez). Donations to the collection come from artists, collectors, and industry professionals. The donated works fulfill criteria established by the Neady Collection Advisory Board, which acknowledges artists who exhibit high standards of draftsmanship and esthetic quality, demonstrate an individual approach, possess technical virtuosity, have worked for high-end magazines, stores or corporations, and have earned the admiration of their peers. The Frances Neady collection’s mission is to encourage and facilitate research by students and industry professionals in the art of fashion illustration. The collection presents a graphic record of the art’s evolution since the 1910s. In addition, it provides a vivid cultural and visual reflection of its time.

Neady Collection Advisory Board

Symposium records

Includes the papers and presentation delivered at the 2014 Symposium "Modes of Modernity The Ephemeral & the Eternal in 20th Century Fashion." The names of the presenters and the title of their presentations contained in this folder are: Jasmine Helm, "Abstract Becoming Modern: The Directoire Revival Style;" Diana Dalmas, "Period Films and the Decline of the Modern 1930-1953;" Danielle Morrin, "Clara Bow: The Rise and Fall of the Fashionable Flapper;" Tae In Ahn, "All that Glitters is not Gold: Shine in Modern Fashion;" Vanessa Garver, "Clothed in the Cosmos: Astronomy in Fashion and Textile Design, 1920-1945."

Lucile, Ltd. records, 1910-1925

  • US NNFIT SC.1
  • Collectie
  • 1863-1935

Collection is comprised of model photographs, sketches, photographs of sketches, show programs, some newspaper and magazine clippings with articles about or by Lucile, order forms, advertisements, and fashion plates. Garment designs include theatrical costumes, wedding gowns, day and evening wear, tea gowns, lingerie and pajamas. Bulk of the collection consists of model photographs, fashion sketches, photographs of sketches and official phototransfers. In addition there are clippings of articles from different publications written by or about Lucile, she wrote regular columns for Hearst publications. Programs for the "Model Parades" introducing lines of clothing for several years. There are some photographs of Lucile's clients, and photographs of "Rose room" interiors of Lucile. Ltd from New York and Chicago locations. Inspirational and reference materials collected by Lucile and/or her staff, mainly fashion plates and newspaper clippings from different publications. Dates range from the early 1910s to the mid 1920s. Model photographs were glued in large format (12-14"w to 16-18"h) standard, blank books to order, referred throughout this finding aid as scrapbooks; there are 12 volumes in the collection. Bulk of original drawings that are arranged according to the type of clothing are loose, drawn on a heavy weight board; sketches for 1916 and 197-18 lines were glued into scrapbooks; there are 12 volumes of original drawings and 2 volumes of photographs and phototransfers. It is possible that two types of arrangement seen throughout the collection (most of Model photographs chronologically, most of sketches by type of clothing) are due to different purpose these materials served; sketches of period gowns or theatrical costumes could have been referred to time and time again for different productions or themed social events, whereas model photographs would have documented actual creation of such a garment at a certain point in time. It is also not clear why, but some scrapbooks with model photographs are reproduced in complete entirety, using same photo session materials some fully annotated.

Duff Gordon, Lucy, Lady

Susan Rietman interview, 2019 February 20

Alex Joseph, Managing Editor of FIT's Hue Magazine interviews Susan Rietman, a professor from FIT's Textile Service Design and Fabric Styling program. Susan recalls her childhood and how her life led to fashion, particularly how a serigraphy course led her into the field textiles. She talks about her mother's designer clothing collection that she has kept, and about her move to New York right after college in 1961. Her first job was with Leslie Tillet at "D.D. and Leslie Tillett" where she helped him design bathing suits, and custom fabric, including fabrics for the 1964 American Worlds Fair pavilions. She talks about her freelance work with Jack Lenor Larsen, and the shoe company she worked on with the Tillets called Shoe Fou, which led to her work for Magnin. She then talks about how she began teaching for the Textile Department at FIT in 1966, a year before the union was introduced, what the college looked like, as well as what the students were like at that time (beehive hairdos, patent leather mascara, classroom smoking), and how things have changed. She recounts her time as acting dean, and the transition the textile department made to using digital technology. She discusses her husband's art book store Jaap Rietman, and how she kept the books after the store closed. She finally discusses the first sustainable project conducted in the Textile program called SOS, Save our Surface, and about a book she's writing about a journalist's archive that was donated to her.

Rietman, Susan

Photographs, Fall, 1915, 1 of 2

Disbound scrapbook, 145 photographs Autumn 1915 line, in 2 folders. Photographs are unannotated. At this time Lady Duff Gordon reached creative and financial pinnacle of her career. Success of New York branch helped to support the war-torn London and Paris branches. This line features a return to the full skirt and decorative pleating and decadent fabrics. Around this time Lucile gained status of a Permanent Resident in the United States. [See--US.NNFIT.SC.1.1.3-6 for annotation, duplicated material (models #91-#105 are not included in this volume)]